Virtual
 
Virtual

SERVICES

  • TOTAL BODY SCAN
  • CORONARY ARTERY CALCIUM SCORING
  • BRAIN
  • NECK
  • PARANASAL SINUS
  • ORBITS
  • FACIAL BONES
  • THORAX (CHEST)
  • CHEST (HIGH RESOLUTION)
  • ABDOMEN & PELVIS
  • ABDOMEN
  • PELVIS
  • EXTREMITIES
  • CORONAL SAGGITAL OBLIQUE
  • MASTOID / IAC'S
  • DENTA SCAN
  • NOBLE GUIDE
  • PITUITARY GLAND
  • CERVICAL SPINE
  • LUMBAR SPINE
  • THORACIC SPINE
  • CT ANGIOGRAPHY
  • CTA ABDOMEN
  • CTA PELVIS
  • CTA CHEST
  • CTA EXTREMITIES
 
 
Multislice - C.T. Imaging
 

Our CT Department provides the community with state of the art CAT Scans. A computerized axial tomography scan is more commonly known by its abbreviated name, CAT scan or CT scan. It is an x-ray procedure which combines many x-ray images with the aid of a computer to generate cross-sectional views and, if needed, three-dimensional images of the internal organs and structures of the body. Imagine the body as a loaf of bread and you are looking at one end of the loaf. As you remove each slice of bread, you can see the entire surface of that slice from the crust to the center. The body is seen on CAT scan slices in a similar fashion from the skin to the central part of the body being examined. When these levels are further "added" together, a three-dimensional picture of an organ or abnormal body structure can be obtained

Preparation

Preparation for your CT will depend on the type of exam; a Virtual Imaging representative will call you prior to your appointment to provide specific instructions, and review health and insurance information.

Notify a member of Virtual Imaging's staff if you are nursing or if there is a chance you could be pregnant.

Bring prior x-rays or scans with you to your exam, if instructed.

Please arrive 15 minutes early to verify your registration.

During the exam

You will lie on a cushioned table, and once comfortably positioned, the tabletop will move through a gantry (shaped like a big donut), which houses the x-ray tube and a set of detectors.

Multiple, low-dose x-rays are passed through the body at different angles. Images are acquired by detectors that measure the x-rays that pass through your body.

The computer processes this information to form an image that the radiologist will review and interpret.

Some CT studies require a contrast material to enhance the visibility of certain tissues or blood vessels. In this instance, you are given an I.V. in your hand or arm. Once the contrast is injected, you may feel a warm, flushed sensation, and experience a metallic taste in your mouth that lasts for about two minutes.

You will receive special instructions if your exam requires you to consume an oral contrast agent (barium sulphate) in advance.

Depending on the type of exam, your CT scan can take anywhere from 10-15 minutes.

 
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